Skip to main content

Even those familiar with Bea’s role at Vatican II may not appreciate how important he was to almost all components of the current crisis in the Church. As discussed below, his influence began with Pius XII and extends to Francis’s Synod on Synodality.

https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/articles/item/6842-surveying-cardinal-augustin-bea-s-path-of-destruction-from-pius-xii-to-the-synod-and-beyond

Tuesday, October 10, 2023

Surveying Cardinal Augustin Bea’s Path of Destruction: From Pius XII to the Synod and Beyond

By:  
Rate this item
(16 votes)
Surveying Cardinal Augustin Bea’s Path of Destruction: From Pius XII to the Synod and Beyond

In his February 25, 2019 address on the fiftieth anniversary of Cardinal Augustin Bea’s death, 


CIC Livestream and video Square banner ad

Tuesday, October 10, 2023

Surveying Cardinal Augustin Bea’s Path of Destruction: From Pius XII to the Synod and Beyond

By:  Robert Morrison | Remnant Columnist

Print

Rate this item12345(16 votes)

Surveying Cardinal Augustin Bea’s Path of Destruction: From Pius XII to the Synod and Beyond

In his February 25, 2019 address on the fiftieth anniversary of Cardinal Augustin Bea’s death, Francis praised Bea’s ability to foster unity among all people as well as his immense influence at Vatican II: 


“[The Cardinal Bea Centre for Judaic Studies], in collaboration with the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, the Pontifical Biblical Institute and the Center for the Study of Christianity in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, is commemorating Cardinal Augustin Bea by a series of scholarly lectures marking the fiftieth anniversary of his death. You thus have an opportunity to reconsider this outstanding figure and his decisive influence on several important documents of the Second Vatican Council. The issues of the Church’s relationship with Judaism, Christian unity, and freedom of conscience and religion, remain significant and extremely timely.”



 


Even those familiar with Bea’s role at Vatican II may not appreciate how important he was to almost all components of the current crisis in the Church. As discussed below, his influence began with Pius XII and extends to Francis’s Synod on Synodality. If we want to truly understand how we got to this point, and where Francis and his collaborators want to take us, we must know about Bea’s work.


Even though we rightly give Bugnini the treacherous distinction of causing the most harm to the liturgy, it appears that Bea was an able, and perhaps even essential, accomplice.


Confessor to Pius XII. As Bea’s longtime secretary, Fr. Stjepan Schmidt, related in his Augustin Bea: Cardinal of Unity, Pius XII needed to have a German-speaking confessor: “[S]ince he had three German nuns to keep house for him, he decided to call a German-speaking priest who could act as confessor both for the sisters and himself.” Pius XII’s first two german-speaking confessors died, so Pius XII chose Fr. Bea as his confessor in 1945. From that point, Bea had a meaningful influence on Pius XII:


“[F]rom the time that he chose him as his own confessor, the pope took to asking his advice more and more often. He wanted to be able to discuss with Bea the serious problems that were submitted to him by the Holy Office, and therefore wanted him to be fully involved as consultor [at the Holy Office] so that he would be fully conversant with these matters, both through personal study and through participation in the regular weekly meetings of that department.” (p. 144)


Although we have no definitive confirmation of Fr. Bea’s influence on Pius XII, Fr. Karl Stehlin speculated that Bea might have had some impact on the pope’s positions regarding the Blessed Virgin Mary:


“[Around 1952], Pius XII began to change his position towards Fatima and he practically never spoke of Fatima again. . . . [I]n his encyclical Mystici Corporis in 1943 he presents Our Lady as Co-redemptrix, as the New Eve and Mediatrix of all graces. Since 1950 he avoids these terms and insists more on her power of intercession. Father Bea had already a very ecumenical attitude towards the Protestants, and certainly wanted to please them. Maybe his influence on the Pope could have provoked this change of attitude.” (Fr. Stehlin, The Great Secret of Fatima, Volume III, p. 42)


Of course this does not prove that Bea had an adverse influence on Pius XII’s papacy. However, as we survey Bea’s involvement in so many destructive changes, it seems improbable that Pius XII could have escaped his toxic influence.


Through the initiative of Bea, John XXIII established the Secretariat for Promoting Christian Unity and appointed Bea as its president.


Liturgical Reform. All of us know the disastrous fruits of the liturgical reform that took place after Vatican II, but signifiant changes already occurred during the papacy of Pius XII, including changes to Holy Week. As Fr. Schmidt describes, Bea played an important role in that process:


“Although he was not a ‘professional liturgist,’ he was given the opportunity to give a decisive spur to the beginning of liturgical reform. And this was one of the reasons why Pius XII assigned him to the ‘Commission of Eight’ which was responsible for this reform in the ten years prior to the Council.” (p. 216)


As the infamous (and likely Freemasonic) secretary of the “Commission of Eight,” Annibale Bugnini, described, Bea’s importance to the liturgical reform resulted, at least in part, from his relationship to Pius XII:


“Everybody eventually came to wait for and welcome his contributions, in which he would make observations that were always pertinent, firmly based and very prudent, and suggest orientations in which various people often thought they could recognize or at least glimpse the thought of the Holy Father Pius XII, to whom he was one of the few to have frequent access.” (p. 146)


Fr. Schmidt also provided two quotes from German liturgist J. Wagner, which give us a deeper appreciation for Bea’s work:


“I can certainly suppose that two great services and thus merits [of Father Bea] as concerns liturgical renewal are known to wider circles: his leading position in preparing the new Latin translation of the psalter, which set consideration of the reform of the breviary in motion, and then his work concerning the reform of the Easter vigil, which acted as a signal for the general liturgical reform.” (p. 235)


“It was an unforgettable moment for me when he [Bea], during the discussion of the Ordo Missae and the need for the reform of the Roman canon, stated with total clarity and without beating around the bush that the vernacular was also necessary in the context of the eucharistic prayer — and this was before anything of this kind had ever been imagined.” (p. 544)


Thus, even though we rightly give Bugnini the treacherous distinction of causing the most harm to the liturgy, it appears that Bea was an able, and perhaps even essential, accomplice.


As more and more faithful Catholics have realized, the evils we see now from Francis’s Synod on Synodality have their roots in Vatican II.


Eucharistic Fast. Fr. Schmidt also pointed to Bea’s role in persuading Pius XII to allow evening Mass and shorten the duration of the Eucharistic fast. In connection with the latter change, we can see Bea’s aptitude in overturning ancient tradition:


“[Bea] said that in view of the fact that a radical change in a very ancient tradition was involved, they must move very cautiously and examine practical results before taking further steps. However, he immediately referred to such further steps: ‘The main thing is that the stone has been set rolling; everything else is simply a question of time. We must earnestly pray that the development will not take too long.’” (p. 221)


This skill would later allow Bea to become one of the most important figures at Vatican II and the cause of so much of the crisis we see today.’s ability to foster unity among all people as well as his immense influence at Vatican II: 

“[The Cardinal Bea Centre for Judaic Studies], in collaboration with the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, the Pontifical Biblical Institute and the Center for the Study of Christianity in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, is commemorating Cardinal Augustin Bea by a series of scholarly lectures marking the fiftieth anniversary of his death. You thus have an opportunity to reconsider this outstanding figure and his decisive influence on several important documents of the Second Vatican Council. The issues of the Church’s relationship with Judaism, Christian unity, and freedom of conscience and religion, remain significant and extremely timely.”

 

Even those familiar with Bea’s role at Vatican II may not appreciate how important he was to almost all components of the current crisis in the Church. As discussed below, his influence began with Pius XII and extends to Francis’s Synod on Synodality. If we want to truly understand how we got to this point, and where Francis and his collaborators want to take us, we must know about Bea’s work.

Even though we rightly give Bugnini the treacherous distinction of causing the most harm to the liturgy, it appears that Bea was an able, and perhaps even essential, accomplice.

Confessor to Pius XII. As Bea’s longtime secretary, Fr. Stjepan Schmidt, related in his Augustin Bea: Cardinal of Unity, Pius XII needed to have a German-speaking confessor: “[S]ince he had three German nuns to keep house for him, he decided to call a German-speaking priest who could act as confessor both for the sisters and himself.” Pius XII’s first two german-speaking confessors died, so Pius XII chose Fr. Bea as his confessor in 1945. From that point, Bea had a meaningful influence on Pius XII:

“[F]rom the time that he chose him as his own confessor, the pope took to asking his advice more and more often. He wanted to be able to discuss with Bea the serious problems that were submitted to him by the Holy Office, and therefore wanted him to be fully involved as consultor [at the Holy Office] so that he would be fully conversant with these matters, both through personal study and through participation in the regular weekly meetings of that department.” (p. 144)

Although we have no definitive confirmation of Fr. Bea’s influence on Pius XII, Fr. Karl Stehlin speculated that Bea might have had some impact on the pope’s positions regarding the Blessed Virgin Mary:

“[Around 1952], Pius XII began to change his position towards Fatima and he practically never spoke of Fatima again. . . . [I]n his encyclical Mystici Corporis in 1943 he presents Our Lady as Co-redemptrix, as the New Eve and Mediatrix of all graces. Since 1950 he avoids these terms and insists more on her power of intercession. Father Bea had already a very ecumenical attitude towards the Protestants, and certainly wanted to please them. Maybe his influence on the Pope could have provoked this change of attitude.” (Fr. Stehlin, The Great Secret of Fatima, Volume III, p. 42)

Of course this does not prove that Bea had an adverse influence on Pius XII’s papacy. However, as we survey Bea’s involvement in so many destructive changes, it seems improbable that Pius XII could have escaped his toxic influence.

Through the initiative of Bea, John XXIII established the Secretariat for Promoting Christian Unity and appointed Bea as its president.

Liturgical Reform. All of us know the disastrous fruits of the liturgical reform that took place after Vatican II, but signifiant changes already occurred during the papacy of Pius XII, including changes to Holy Week. As Fr. Schmidt describes, Bea played an important role in that process:

“Although he was not a ‘professional liturgist,’ he was given the opportunity to give a decisive spur to the beginning of liturgical reform. And this was one of the reasons why Pius XII assigned him to the ‘Commission of Eight’ which was responsible for this reform in the ten years prior to the Council.” (p. 216)

As the infamous (and likely Freemasonic) secretary of the “Commission of Eight,” Annibale Bugnini, described, Bea’s importance to the liturgical reform resulted, at least in part, from his relationship to Pius XII:

“Everybody eventually came to wait for and welcome his contributions, in which he would make observations that were always pertinent, firmly based and very prudent, and suggest orientations in which various people often thought they could recognize or at least glimpse the thought of the Holy Father Pius XII, to whom he was one of the few to have frequent access.” (p. 146)

Fr. Schmidt also provided two quotes from German liturgist J. Wagner, which give us a deeper appreciation for Bea’s work:

“I can certainly suppose that two great services and thus merits [of Father Bea] as concerns liturgical renewal are known to wider circles: his leading position in preparing the new Latin translation of the psalter, which set consideration of the reform of the breviary in motion, and then his work concerning the reform of the Easter vigil, which acted as a signal for the general liturgical reform.” (p. 235)

“It was an unforgettable moment for me when he [Bea], during the discussion of the Ordo Missae and the need for the reform of the Roman canon, stated with total clarity and without beating around the bush that the vernacular was also necessary in the context of the eucharistic prayer — and this was before anything of this kind had ever been imagined.” (p. 544)

Thus, even though we rightly give Bugnini the treacherous distinction of causing the most harm to the liturgy, it appears that Bea was an able, and perhaps even essential, accomplice.

As more and more faithful Catholics have realized, the evils we see now from Francis’s Synod on Synodality have their roots in Vatican II.

Eucharistic Fast. Fr. Schmidt also pointed to Bea’s role in persuading Pius XII to allow evening Mass and shorten the duration of the Eucharistic fast. In connection with the latter change, we can see Bea’s aptitude in overturning ancient tradition:

“[Bea] said that in view of the fact that a radical change in a very ancient tradition was involved, they must move very cautiously and examine practical results before taking further steps. However, he immediately referred to such further steps: ‘The main thing is that the stone has been set rolling; everything else is simply a question of time. We must earnestly pray that the development will not take too long.’” (p. 221)

This skill would later allow Bea to become one of the most important figures at Vatican II and the cause of so much of the crisis we see today. we see today.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

My good friend ( now deceased ), Mother Teresa of the Still River Mass convent , called me years before the McLucas story broke.

https://akacatholic.com/cmtv-vs-sspx/ Latest Comments 2Vermont JULY 30, 2019 I think the only thing I would add here is what seems like MV’S obsession with things of a sexual nature. Tom A JULY 30, 2019 He, like many, defend the institution with the zeal that should be used to defend the Faith. Sad. What Mr. Voris fails to admit is that it is the institution of the conciliar fake church that is the biggest enemy of the Faith. Lynda JULY 30, 2019 Blinded by secular values and prestige of man. coastalfarm JULY 30, 2019 Please see the article “Unmarked building, quiet legal help for accused priests” Dryden, Mich. (AP) for the priest Mr. Voris defends, Rev.Eduard Perrone of Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Church also known as Assumption Grotto, is co-founder of Opus Bono Sacerdotii. This non-profit organization takes in accused priests and gives them shelter, legal defense, transportation, etc. Opus Bono claims to have helped over 8,000 priests and has raised over $8 million 2002-201

Might Biden be a Liar & Predator like McCarrick?

September 15, 2020   Everyone knows that sexual predator ex-cardinal Theodore McCarrick is a liar. His whole life was a lie of betrayal of the most sacred vows he took and the violation of the moral tenets of the Catholic faith which he desecrated. Most people don't realize that part of this desecration of lies included lying for "gravely sinful" Democrats like Joe Biden. McCarrick protected Biden when then head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (later to be Pope Benedict XVI) wrote that bishops were not to admit to Communion politicians like "gravely sinful" Biden who supports the killing of unborn babies. McCarrick lied for politicians like Biden by ignoring the important parts of the Ratzinger letter and told bishops not to ignore the Catholic Church law.  Last year, Fr. Robert Morey denied Holy Communion to the “gravely sinful” Biden following a "2004 decree signed jointly by the bishops of

The Biben Lying Machine: "Joe , do you know what else is a Sin besides Killing Babies? Lying... "

October 09, 2020   It appears that Joe Biden was even a lying machine in 2008 according to the post " Media Ignores Biden Repeatedly Lies During 'Meet the Press' Interview" on the Weasel Zippers website: Joe Biden Repeatedly Lies During "Meet the Press" Interview, Claims he Doesn't Support Taxpayer Funded Abortions.....   Joe, do you know what else is a sin besides killing babies? Lying... ... Joe Biden repeatedly made the claim in a Sunday interview on the NBC political show "Meet the Press" that he opposes taxpayer funding of abortions. However, a look at his voting record over the years reveals numerous instances where Barack Obama's pro-abortion running mate did exactly that. "I don't support public, public funding. I don't, because that flips the burden. That's then telling me I have to accept a different view," he said on the program. As recently as February, Biden voted against an amendmen